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From blindness to visual impairment : terminological typology and the Social Model of Disability

By: Bolt, David.
Series: Disability & Society 20 (5) 2005: 539-552.Publisher: 2005Subject(s): MODELS | SOCIAL ASPECTS | SOCIAL CONTEXT | TERMINOLOGY | VISUAL DISABILITYSummary: Notes that the Social Model of Disability holds that persons are impaired for a number of reasons, but that it is only by society that they are disabled. Takes this idea and focuses on terminology as a key component in psychocultural representation produced in a disabling society. Proposes a tripartite typology consisting of ableism, disablement and impairment, the first phase of which is rendered outmoded, the . Suggests, using this hierarchical categorisation as a basis, that terminology like blindness and the blind might be rejected in favour of that which denotes only visual impairment, the progressive terminology that corresponds with insights gained from the Social Model of Disability.
List(s) this item appears in: Words matter March 2019
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Notes that the Social Model of Disability holds that persons are impaired for a number of reasons, but that it is only by society that they are disabled. Takes this idea and focuses on terminology as a key component in psychocultural representation produced in a disabling society. Proposes a tripartite typology consisting of ableism, disablement and impairment, the first phase of which is rendered outmoded, the . Suggests, using this hierarchical categorisation as a basis, that terminology like blindness and the blind might be rejected in favour of that which denotes only visual impairment, the progressive terminology that corresponds with insights gained from the Social Model of Disability.

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