Effects of a Self-Advocacy Intervention on Abilities of Black College Students With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to Request Academic Accommodations

By: Brendli, Katherine R.
Contributor(s): Holzberg, Debra | Scott, LaRon A | Thoma, Colleen | Xu, Yaoying.
Series: Inclusion 9 (3) 225-240: 2021. 2021Disc region: text file PDF rda.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resource Online resources: Read this Article Summary: Several barriers exist that inhibit the success of students with disabilities in postsecondary education environments, one of which is the lack of self-advocacy skills to effectively request academic modifications and ask for other supports when needed. In this study, we used a single-subject multiple-probe across participants design to examine the effects of a self-advocacy intervention on the abilities of college students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to request their academic accommodations. We primarily focused the intervention on Black youth with IDD attending an inclusive higher education program. Results indicate moderate to strong evidence of a functional relation between the intervention and the students' abilities to request academic accommodations. Implications for future research, policy, and practice are discussed.
List(s) this item appears in: Advocacy- getting involved May 22
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Several barriers exist that inhibit the success of students with disabilities in postsecondary education environments, one of which is the lack of self-advocacy skills to effectively request academic modifications and ask for other supports when needed. In this study, we used a single-subject multiple-probe across participants design to examine the effects of a self-advocacy intervention on the abilities of college students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) to request their academic accommodations. We primarily focused the intervention on Black youth with IDD attending an inclusive higher education program. Results indicate moderate to strong evidence of a functional relation between the intervention and the students' abilities to request academic accommodations. Implications for future research, policy, and practice are discussed.

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