Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Valuing profoundly disabled people: fellowship, community and ties of birth / John Vorhaus

By: Vorhaus, John.
Publisher: London : New York, NY ; Routledge, 2018Copyright date: 2018Description: ix, 159 pages : 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780367192440.Subject(s): PROFOUND INTELLECTUAL AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES | DIGNITY | RESPECT | DEPENDENCY | CITIZENSHIP | MORALITY | HUMAN RIGHTS | SOCIAL POLICY | PHILOSOPHY | ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY | PERSONHOOD
Contents:
1. Introduction. - 2. Our fellow creatures. - 3. Sharing in a common life. - 4. Respect and identification. - Human dignity. - 6. Capability, functioning and freedom. - 7. Dependency. - 8. Citizenship: the right to vote. - 9. Our fellow creatures revisited. - 10. Afterword. - Appendix. - Bibliography. - Index
Summary: "Growing numbers of babies are surviving into infancy and beyond with profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities. The conditions and abilities that characterise these lives are the subject of an extensive educational and medical literature. However, much less is written about the broader themes that emerge from reflection on profound disability. This book provides a series of philosophical reflections on the moral, social, political and educational questions that arise in response to human beings whose lives are characterised by dependency, vulnerability and profound impairment: what is the place of autonomy in the lives of profoundly disabled people with life limiting conditions? In what sense can we consider someone as a ‘citizen’ if they have no understanding of their own interests? Does the requirement to show respect for persons apply to everyone, irrespective of whether they have any conception of their own dignity? How should we compare the moral status of a human being with a non-human animal possessing equivalent or more elaborate capabilities? This book explores such questions as these, which are found to apply not only to profoundly disabled people, but also to people whose cognitive and other powers are undermined by the advance of dementia and related diseases of the brain." http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10021682/
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
Main Collection 710.2 VOR (Browse shelf) 1 Available W009990
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Introduction. - 2. Our fellow creatures. - 3. Sharing in a common life. - 4. Respect and identification. - Human dignity. - 6. Capability, functioning and freedom. - 7. Dependency. - 8. Citizenship: the right to vote. - 9. Our fellow creatures revisited. - 10. Afterword. - Appendix. - Bibliography. - Index

"Growing numbers of babies are surviving into infancy and beyond with profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities. The conditions and abilities that characterise these lives are the subject of an extensive educational and medical literature. However, much less is written about the broader themes that emerge from reflection on profound disability. This book provides a series of philosophical reflections on the moral, social, political and educational questions that arise in response to human beings whose lives are characterised by dependency, vulnerability and profound impairment: what is the place of autonomy in the lives of profoundly disabled people with life limiting conditions? In what sense can we consider someone as a ‘citizen’ if they have no understanding of their own interests? Does the requirement to show respect for persons apply to everyone, irrespective of whether they have any conception of their own dignity? How should we compare the moral status of a human being with a non-human animal possessing equivalent or more elaborate capabilities? This book explores such questions as these, which are found to apply not only to profoundly disabled people, but also to people whose cognitive and other powers are undermined by the advance of dementia and related diseases of the brain."
http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/10021682/

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//