Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Inventing ourselves : the secret life of the teenage brain / Sarah-Jayne Blakemore.

By: Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne.
Publisher: London : Black Swan, 2019Copyright date: 2018Description: 240 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781784161347 (paperback).Subject(s): ADOLESCENCE | BRAIN DEVELOPMENT | PSYCHOLOGY | NEUROSCIENCES
Contents:
1. Adolescence isn't an aberration. - 2. A sense of self. - 3. Fitting in. - 4. Inside the skull. - 5, Inside the living brain. - 6. The ever-plastic brain. - 7. Social mind, social brain. - 8. Understanding other people. - 9. The right sort of risks. - 10. When things go wrong. - 11. Educating the brain. - 12. It's the journey that matters. - Notes. - Acknowledgements. - Illustration sources. - Index.
Summary: Our personalities, aspirations and dreams are all established in our brains. It creates every feeling, emotion and desire we experience, and stores every one of our memories. And yet, until very recently, we believed that it stopped developing in childhood; that by the time you reached adolescence, your brain was fully developed. In Inventing Ourselves, award-winning neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore reveals that this is simply not the case. There are fundamental differences between the adult and adolescent brain, and typical teenage behaviour - risk taking, intense relationships, going to bed and getting up late - is caused by the transformations that take place during this formative period. Perhaps unsurprisingly, these physiological changes are most evident in the prefrontal cortex, the region responsible for decision-making, planning, inhibiting inappropriate behaviour, evaluating risk and understanding others. While working in a psychiatric hospital in Versailles, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore was struck by the realisation that every patient first experienced symptoms during this pivotal period. Why is this? What happens to our brains during our teenage years? And what makes adolescent brains particularly vulnerable to illnesses such as schizophrenia? With implications for education, parenting and treating mental health conditions, Inventing Ourselves will transform the way we think about adolescence and reveal that the changes we experience throughout our teenage years dictate the adults we become.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
Main Collection 410.3 BLA (Browse shelf) Checked out 06/09/2019 W0011711
Total holds: 1

Originally published: 2018.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Adolescence isn't an aberration. - 2. A sense of self. - 3. Fitting in. - 4. Inside the skull. - 5, Inside the living brain. - 6. The ever-plastic brain. - 7. Social mind, social brain. - 8. Understanding other people. - 9. The right sort of risks. - 10. When things go wrong. - 11. Educating the brain. - 12. It's the journey that matters. - Notes. - Acknowledgements. - Illustration sources. - Index.

Our personalities, aspirations and dreams are all established in our brains. It creates every feeling, emotion and desire we experience, and stores every one of our memories. And yet, until very recently, we believed that it stopped developing in childhood; that by the time you reached adolescence, your brain was fully developed. In Inventing Ourselves, award-winning neuroscientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore reveals that this is simply not the case. There are fundamental differences between the adult and adolescent brain, and typical teenage behaviour - risk taking, intense relationships, going to bed and getting up late - is caused by the transformations that take place during this formative period. Perhaps unsurprisingly, these physiological changes are most evident in the prefrontal cortex, the region responsible for decision-making, planning, inhibiting inappropriate behaviour, evaluating risk and understanding others. While working in a psychiatric hospital in Versailles, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore was struck by the realisation that every patient first experienced symptoms during this pivotal period. Why is this? What happens to our brains during our teenage years? And what makes adolescent brains particularly vulnerable to illnesses such as schizophrenia? With implications for education, parenting and treating mental health conditions, Inventing Ourselves will transform the way we think about adolescence and reveal that the changes we experience throughout our teenage years dictate the adults we become.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//