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Care work : dreaming disability justice / Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha.

By: Piepzna-Samarasinha, Leah Lakshmi 1975-.
Publisher: Vancouver : Arsenal Pulp Press, 2018Copyright date: 2018Description: 263 pages ; 21 cm illustrations.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781551527383.Other title: Dreaming disability justice.Subject(s): DISABILITY | LEGAL RIGHTS | SOCIAL JUSTICE | HEALTH CARE | FEMINISM | LGBT
Contents:
Care webs : experimenting in creating collective access -- Crip emotional intelligence -- Making space accessible is an act of love for our communities -- Toronto crip city : a not-so-brief, incomplete personal history of some moments in time, 1997-2015 -- Sick and crazy healer : a not-so-brief personal history of the healing justice movement -- Crip sex movements and the lust of recognition : a conversation with E.T. Russian -- Cripping the apocalypse : some of my wild disability justice dreams -- A modest proposal for a fair trade emotional labor economy (centered by disabled, femme of color, working-class/poor genius) -- Prefigurative politics and radically accessible performance spaces : making the world to come -- Chronically ill touring artist pro tips -- Fuck the "triumph of the human spirit" : on writing Dirty River as a queer, disabled, and femme-of-color memoir, and the joys of saying fuck you to traditional abuse survivor narratives -- Suicidal ideation 2.0 : queer community leadership and staying alive anyway -- So much time spent in bed : a letter to Gloria Anzald�ua on chronic illness, coatlicue, and creativity -- Prince, chronic pain, and living to get old -- Two or three things I know for sure about femmes and suicide : a love letter -- For badass disability justice, working-class and poor-led models of sustainable hustling for liberation -- Protect your heart : femme leadership and hyper-accountability -- Not over it, not fixed, and living a life worth living : towards an anti-ableist vision of survivorhood -- Crip lineages, crip futures : a conversation with Stacey Milbern.
Summary: "Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha is a poet and essayist whose most recent book, the memoir Dirty River, was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award and the Publishing Triangle's Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction. She is also a long-time member of the disability justice movement, which advocates for the rights of the disabled. In her latest book of essays, Leah writes passionately and personally about disability justice, on subject such as the creation of care webs, collective access, and radically accessible spaces. She also imparts her own survivor skills and wisdom based on her years of activist work, empowering the disabled--in particular, those in queer and/or BIPOC communities--and granting them the necessary tools by which they can imagine a future where no one is left behind. Presently, disability justice and emotional/care work are buzzwords on many people's lips, and the disabled and sick are discovering new ways to build power within themselves and each other; at the same time, those powers remain at risk in this fragile political climate in which we find ourselves. Powerful and passionate, Care Work is a crucial and necessary call to arms. "-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
Main Collection 200 PIE (Browse shelf) Available W0011670
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 257-263).

Care webs : experimenting in creating collective access -- Crip emotional intelligence -- Making space accessible is an act of love for our communities -- Toronto crip city : a not-so-brief, incomplete personal history of some moments in time, 1997-2015 -- Sick and crazy healer : a not-so-brief personal history of the healing justice movement -- Crip sex movements and the lust of recognition : a conversation with E.T. Russian -- Cripping the apocalypse : some of my wild disability justice dreams -- A modest proposal for a fair trade emotional labor economy (centered by disabled, femme of color, working-class/poor genius) -- Prefigurative politics and radically accessible performance spaces : making the world to come -- Chronically ill touring artist pro tips -- Fuck the "triumph of the human spirit" : on writing Dirty River as a queer, disabled, and femme-of-color memoir, and the joys of saying fuck you to traditional abuse survivor narratives -- Suicidal ideation 2.0 : queer community leadership and staying alive anyway -- So much time spent in bed : a letter to Gloria Anzald�ua on chronic illness, coatlicue, and creativity -- Prince, chronic pain, and living to get old -- Two or three things I know for sure about femmes and suicide : a love letter -- For badass disability justice, working-class and poor-led models of sustainable hustling for liberation -- Protect your heart : femme leadership and hyper-accountability -- Not over it, not fixed, and living a life worth living : towards an anti-ableist vision of survivorhood -- Crip lineages, crip futures : a conversation with Stacey Milbern.

"Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha is a poet and essayist whose most recent book, the memoir Dirty River, was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award and the Publishing Triangle's Judy Grahn Award for Lesbian Nonfiction. She is also a long-time member of the disability justice movement, which advocates for the rights of the disabled. In her latest book of essays, Leah writes passionately and personally about disability justice, on subject such as the creation of care webs, collective access, and radically accessible spaces. She also imparts her own survivor skills and wisdom based on her years of activist work, empowering the disabled--in particular, those in queer and/or BIPOC communities--and granting them the necessary tools by which they can imagine a future where no one is left behind. Presently, disability justice and emotional/care work are buzzwords on many people's lips, and the disabled and sick are discovering new ways to build power within themselves and each other; at the same time, those powers remain at risk in this fragile political climate in which we find ourselves. Powerful and passionate, Care Work is a crucial and necessary call to arms. "-- Provided by publisher.

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