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Clinical outcomes of staff training in positive behavioural support to reduce challenging behaviour in adults with intellectual disability: Further thoughts on intervention, implementation and interpretation

By: Allen, David.
Contributor(s): Jones, Edwin | Nethell, Gill.
Series: International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support 8 (1) Spring 2018: 4-11. 2018Subject(s): INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY | CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR | ADULTS | POSITIVE BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT | STAFF TRAINING | IMPLEMENTATIONOnline resources: Click to read article online IHC Library Members Summary: Hassiotis et al (2018a, b) recently reported on a trial of the provision a short form of PBS training to staff working in National Health Service teams in England which reported no beneficial clinical effects from the intervention. In doing so, they acknowledged a number of factors that may have impacted on the outcomes. This paper is written by the trainers who delivered the intervention in the study and offers additional thoughts on the implementational issues with the research and the validity of its results. Its aim is to supplement the principal study reports and to help ensure that the study is accurately reported and interpreted.
List(s) this item appears in: Support Staff Violence Assault
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Hassiotis et al (2018a, b) recently reported on a trial of the provision a short form of PBS training to staff working
in National Health Service teams in England which reported no beneficial clinical effects from the intervention. In doing so, they acknowledged a number of factors that may have impacted on the outcomes. This paper is written by the trainers who delivered the intervention in the study and offers additional thoughts on the implementational issues with the research and the validity of its results. Its aim is to supplement the principal study reports and to help ensure that the study is accurately reported and interpreted.

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