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Unwritten rules of social relationships : decoding social mysteries through Autism's unique perspectives / Dr. Temple Grandin & Sean Barron ; edited by Veronica Zysk.

By: Grandin, Temple.
Contributor(s): Barron, Sean [author.] | Zysk, Veronica [editor.].
Publisher: Arlington, TX : Future Horizons, 2016Copyright date: 2016Edition: New edition with author updates.Description: xix, 426 pages ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781941765388 (paperback).Subject(s): AUTISM | SOCIAL INTERACTION | SOCIALISATION | INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
Contents:
Introduction. - PART ONE: Two perspectives om social thinking. - My world is what I do / Temple Grandin. - A different perspective / Sean Barron. - PART TWO: Two minds: two paths. - How the autistic way of thinking affects social understanding. - INTERLUDE. - PART THREE: The ten unwritten rules of social relationships. - Rule #1: Rules are not absolute; they are situation-based and people-based. - Rule #2: Not everything that happens is equally important in the grand scheme of things. - Rule #3: Everyone in the world makes mistakes; it doesn't have to ruin your day. - Rule #4: Honesty is different than diplomacy. - Rule #5: Being polite is apprpriate in any situation. - Rule #6: Not everyone who is nice to me is my friend. - Rule #7: People act differently in public than they do in private. - Rule #8: Know when you are turning people off. - Rule #9: "Fitting in" is often tied to looking and sounding like you fit in. - Rule #10: People are responsible for their own behaviors. - Temple's epilogue. - Sean's epilogue. - References.
Summary: Born with autism, both Temple Grandin and Sean Barron now live famously successful social lives. However, their paths were quite different. Temple's logical mind controlled her social behavior. She interacted with many adults and other children, experiencing varied social situations. Logic informed her decision to obey social rules and avoid unpleasant consequences. Sean's emotions controlled his social behavior. Baffled by social rules, isolated and friendless, he made up his own, and applied them to others. When they inevitably broke his rules, he felt worthless and unloved. Both Temple and Sean ultimately came to terms with the social world and found their places in it. Whether you are a person with autism, a caregiver in the autism community, or just someone interested in an outsider view of society, their powerful stories will enthrall and enlighten you.Review: I found this book really interesting to read. Knowing, learning understanding about some of the unseen rules of social relationships. I have been through some of the situations that Temple Grandin and Sean Barron have been through and can relate to them after reading the book and thinking back on my own experiences and why I have done diffrent things. I would recommend that everyone reads the book and relates to it After all we all have some autism in ourselves even though we don’t always realise it It would be handy for people to read when they are starting to support people with an intellectual disability and then they may understand why the people they support act like they do at times I guess there are lots of people with intellectual disability and Autism out there that have never been assessed with it for one reason or another. I have been told over the years that I had some form of autism and didn’t get it confirmed until my family paid for me to have a private assessment. I realise that I am lucky having the support of my family to be able to do this. It is really good to read and to understand some of the things people have told me about and now I can understand more what they were talking about than before I read the book.
List(s) this item appears in: Asperger syndrome and young women. August 2017
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 423-426).

Introduction. - PART ONE: Two perspectives om social thinking. - My world is what I do / Temple Grandin. - A different perspective / Sean Barron. - PART TWO: Two minds: two paths. - How the autistic way of thinking affects social understanding. - INTERLUDE. - PART THREE: The ten unwritten rules of social relationships. - Rule #1: Rules are not absolute; they are situation-based and people-based. - Rule #2: Not everything that happens is equally important in the grand scheme of things. - Rule #3: Everyone in the world makes mistakes; it doesn't have to ruin your day. - Rule #4: Honesty is different than diplomacy. - Rule #5: Being polite is apprpriate in any situation. - Rule #6: Not everyone who is nice to me is my friend. - Rule #7: People act differently in public than they do in private. - Rule #8: Know when you are turning people off. - Rule #9: "Fitting in" is often tied to looking and sounding like you fit in. - Rule #10: People are responsible for their own behaviors. - Temple's epilogue. - Sean's epilogue. - References.

Born with autism, both Temple Grandin and Sean Barron now live famously successful social lives. However, their paths were quite different. Temple's logical mind controlled her social behavior. She interacted with many adults and other children, experiencing varied social situations. Logic informed her decision to obey social rules and avoid unpleasant consequences. Sean's emotions controlled his social behavior. Baffled by social rules, isolated and friendless, he made up his own, and applied them to others. When they inevitably broke his rules, he felt worthless and unloved. Both Temple and Sean ultimately came to terms with the social world and found their places in it. Whether you are a person with autism, a caregiver in the autism community, or just someone interested in an outsider view of society, their powerful stories will enthrall and enlighten you.

I found this book really interesting to read. Knowing, learning understanding about some of the unseen rules of social relationships.
I have been through some of the situations that Temple Grandin and Sean Barron have been through and can relate to them after reading the book and thinking back on my own experiences and why I have done diffrent things.
I would recommend that everyone reads the book and relates to it
After all we all have some autism in ourselves even though we don’t always realise it
It would be handy for people to read when they are starting to support people with an intellectual disability and then they may understand why the people they support act like they do at times
I guess there are lots of people with intellectual disability and Autism out there that have never been assessed with it for one reason or another.
I have been told over the years that I had some form of autism and didn’t get it confirmed until my family paid for me to have a private assessment. I realise that I am lucky having the support of my family to be able to do this.
It is really good to read and to understand some of the things people have told me about and now I can understand more what they were talking about than before I read the book.

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