Normal view MARC view ISBD view

‘It's different, but it's the same’ : perspectives of young adults with siblings with intellectual disabilities in residential care

By: Jacobs, Paula.
Contributor(s): MacMahon, Ken.
Series: British Journal of Learning Disabilities 45 (1) March 2017: 12-20. 2017Subject(s): SEVERE PROFOUND AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES | RESIDENTIAL CARE | SIBLINGS | YOUNG ADULTS | PERSONAL NARRATIVES | FUTURE PROSPECTS | FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS | AMBIVALENCEOnline resources: Click to read article online IHC Library Members Summary: Siblings often play significant roles in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. This study aimed to give voice to young adults whose siblings have an intellectual disability and are in residential care. Emergent themes included family and sibling relationships and concerns for the future. However, ambivalence, in terms of conflicting feelings within participants themselves, was striking. Dissonances within narratives included identifying as ‘one family’ whilst living apart, experiencing guilt while being supportive of the residential placement, and emphasising the normality of the sibling experience whilst also feeling different and isolated.
List(s) this item appears in: British Journal of Learning Disabilities CM April 17
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Article IHC Library
Available (Article available on request) W008130
Total holds: 0

Siblings often play significant roles in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. This study aimed to give voice to young adults whose siblings have an intellectual disability and are in residential care. Emergent themes included family and sibling relationships and concerns for the future. However, ambivalence, in terms of conflicting feelings within participants themselves, was striking. Dissonances within narratives included identifying as ‘one family’ whilst living apart, experiencing guilt while being supportive of the residential placement, and emphasising the normality of the sibling experience whilst also feeling different and isolated.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//