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Teaching Intensive Interaction to paid carers : using the ‘communities of practice’ model to inform training

By: Rayner, Kelly.
Contributor(s): Bradley, Samantha | Johnson, Gemma | Mrozik, Jennifer H | Appiah, Afua | Nagra, Maninder K.
Series: British Journal of Learning Disabilities 44 (1) March 2016: 63-70. 2016Subject(s): SEVERE PROFOUND AND MULTIPLE DISABILITIES | INTENSIVE INTERACTION | STAFF TRAINING | OUTCOMES | COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE MODELOnline resources: Click to read article online IHC Library Members Summary: Explains that Intensive Interaction is an approach that can help carers develop their skills to engage people with severe and profound learning disabilities in personally relevant communication. Used interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the lived experience of Intensive Interaction training and practice of three paid carers. Three superordinate themes emerged from the analysis: ‘Investment’, ‘Outcomes’ and ‘Challenges’. Results suggest that participants had an overwhelmingly positive experience in learning and using Intensive Interaction and that coaching, supervision and support were vital. The clinical and practical implications for this are discussed.
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Explains that Intensive Interaction is an approach that can help carers develop their skills to engage people with severe and profound learning disabilities in personally relevant communication. Used interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore the lived experience of Intensive Interaction training and practice of three paid carers. Three superordinate themes emerged from the analysis: ‘Investment’, ‘Outcomes’ and ‘Challenges’. Results suggest that participants had an overwhelmingly positive experience in learning and using Intensive Interaction and that coaching, supervision and support were vital. The clinical and practical implications for this are discussed.

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