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Activity schedules for children with autism : teaching independent behavior

By: McClannahan, Lynn E.
Contributor(s): Krantz, Patricia J.
Series: Topics in autism.Publisher: Bethesda, MD Woodbine House 2010Edition: 2nd ed.Description: xii, 147 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781606130032.Subject(s): CHILDREN | ADULTS | AUTISM | ACTIVITIES | INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS | SOCIAL INTERACTION | CHOICE
Contents:
Independence, choice and social interaction|Prerequisite skills : is my child ready for an activity schedule?|Preparing a first activity schedule|A different way to teach|Measuring schedule following|The first schedule is mastered!|When do activities end?|Increasing choice|From pictures to words|Expanding social interaction skills|Activity schedules for adults|Activity schedules : a platform for progress|Problem solving|Appendices
Summary: "A revolutionary teaching tool, an activity schedule is a set of pictures and/or words that cue children and adults to perform tasks, engage in activities, or enjoy rewards. For example, activity schedules can help a person do laundry, talk to a classmate, or play with toys. This new edition of the bestselling guide for families and professionals covers all the exciting successes and far-reaching impacts of using activity schedules--increased independence, social interaction, self-management--and provides the reader with step-by-step guidance for creating and implementing them" - BOOK JACKETReview: Describes an activity schedule as “a set of pictures or words that cues someone to engage in a sequence of activities. An activity schedule can take many forms, but initially it is usually a three-ring binder with pictures or words on each page that cue children to perform tasks, engage in activities, or enjoy rewards.” The information provided is extremely practical covering, inter alia, the skills required before attempting an activity schedule, how to construct an activity schedule especially suited to a child’s strengths, detailed information about the teaching procedures, how to measure a child’s schedule-following skills, how children learn to follow written, rather than pictorial schedules, how to use schedules to expand social interaction skills, how schedules can be helpful to adults with autism. Includes illustrative examples and a problem solving chapter and the appendices include data sheet forms and supplier information (US) for button-activated voice recorders and audio card readers.
List(s) this item appears in: Autism and Choice - Hook
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    average rating: 3.0 (1 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
720 MCC (Browse shelf) Available W000673
Book IHC Library
720 MCC (Browse shelf) Available W000196
Total holds: 0

Donated by The Freemasons Charity

Independence, choice and social interaction|Prerequisite skills : is my child ready for an activity schedule?|Preparing a first activity schedule|A different way to teach|Measuring schedule following|The first schedule is mastered!|When do activities end?|Increasing choice|From pictures to words|Expanding social interaction skills|Activity schedules for adults|Activity schedules : a platform for progress|Problem solving|Appendices

"A revolutionary teaching tool, an activity schedule is a set of pictures and/or words that cue children and adults to perform tasks, engage in activities, or enjoy rewards. For example, activity schedules can help a person do laundry, talk to a classmate, or play with toys. This new edition of the bestselling guide for families and professionals covers all the exciting successes and far-reaching impacts of using activity schedules--increased independence, social interaction, self-management--and provides the reader with step-by-step guidance for creating and implementing them" - BOOK JACKET

Describes an activity schedule as “a set of pictures or words that cues someone to engage in a sequence of activities. An activity schedule can take many forms, but initially it is usually a three-ring binder with pictures or words on each page that cue children to perform tasks, engage in activities, or enjoy rewards.”

The information provided is extremely practical covering, inter alia, the skills required before attempting an activity schedule, how to construct an activity schedule especially suited to a child’s strengths, detailed information about the teaching procedures, how to measure a child’s schedule-following skills, how children learn to follow written, rather than pictorial schedules, how to use schedules to expand social interaction skills, how schedules can be helpful to adults with autism.

Includes illustrative examples and a problem solving chapter and the appendices include data sheet forms and supplier information (US) for button-activated voice recorders and audio card readers.

Patron comment on

The appendix for resources was useful, as well as the progressional scheduling for students

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