A parenting guide for families of children with disabilities : developing social skills towards independent living

By: Keiling, Patricia.
Contributor(s): Lenzo, Patricia Navarro.
Publisher: Pittsburgh, PA Dorrance Publishing 2010Description: 91 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.ISBN: 9781434905970.Subject(s): CHILDREN | PARENTING | DISABILITY | INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS | SELF ADVOCACY | COMMUNICATION | NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION | PERSONAL HYGIENE | FUNCTIONAL SKILLS
Contents:
Baby birds in the nest|Introduction|Philosophy|Building a foundation|Dreams and goals|Ten top tools to use throughout the program|Self advocacy|Nonverbal communication Part one: First impressions Part two: Behaviors|Verbal communication|Daily living and community skills|Organizational planners|Family action plan worksheet|Conclusion|Birds fly out of the nest
Summary: "Every family has its own ideas about raising children. These ideas come from life and educational experiences. For many people. however, there is little or no experience regarding raising a child with a disability. The purpose of this guide it to help families with a child with a disability develop a personal philosophy of how to raise their child. Your child's ability to advocate for him or herself will lead to as much independence as possible. This guide focuses on the social skills needed for self-advocacy, which increases independent skills for home, work and community interaction." - INTRODUCTIONReview: It doesn't claim to offer the 'right' way to parent a disabled child. Instead it offers tips to help each family develop a personal philosophy towards achieving success. From a review written by Thomas Smythe In their introduction the authors state that “this guide focuses on the social skills needed for self-advocacy, which increases independent skills for home, school, work and community interaction”. Certainly a glance at the contents page reveals a comprehensive list of issues and topics leading to family action plans and ultimately the “birds fly out of the nest”! Just to mention a few there is personal hygiene, physical issues including eye contact and personal space, daily living skills looking at shopping, banking and leisure. I really like the lay out throughout which makes for an easy read; the development of ideas through goal setting, suggestions, supporting tips and key areas to think about; the use of imagery, action plans and quotes; and finally the fact that this is an open guide not restricted to a particular disability, nor type of family. This will be useful for any family raising a child with a disability.
List(s) this item appears in: Life skills for young children. June 2017
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    Average rating: 3.0 (1 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
310 KEI (Browse shelf) Available W000684
Book IHC Library
310 KEI (Browse shelf) Available W002016
Book IHC Library
Main Collection 310 KEI (Browse shelf) 3 Available W0014073
Total holds: 0

Baby birds in the nest|Introduction|Philosophy|Building a foundation|Dreams and goals|Ten top tools to use throughout the program|Self advocacy|Nonverbal communication
Part one: First impressions
Part two: Behaviors|Verbal communication|Daily living and community skills|Organizational planners|Family action plan worksheet|Conclusion|Birds fly out of the nest

"Every family has its own ideas about raising children. These ideas come from life and educational experiences. For many people. however, there is little or no experience regarding raising a child with a disability. The purpose of this guide it to help families with a child with a disability develop a personal philosophy of how to raise their child. Your child's ability to advocate for him or herself will lead to as much independence as possible. This guide focuses on the social skills needed for self-advocacy, which increases independent skills for home, work and community interaction." - INTRODUCTION

It doesn't claim to offer the 'right' way to parent a disabled child. Instead it offers tips to help each family develop a personal philosophy towards achieving success. From a review written by Thomas Smythe

In their introduction the authors state that “this guide focuses on the social skills needed for self-advocacy, which increases independent skills for home, school, work and community interaction”. Certainly a glance at the contents page reveals a comprehensive list of issues and topics leading to family action plans and ultimately the “birds fly out of the nest”! Just to mention a few there is personal hygiene, physical issues including eye contact and personal space, daily living skills looking at shopping, banking and leisure.

I really like the lay out throughout which makes for an easy read; the development of ideas through goal setting, suggestions, supporting tips and key areas to think about; the use of imagery, action plans and quotes; and finally the fact that this is an open guide not restricted to a particular disability, nor type of family.

This will be useful for any family raising a child with a disability.

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