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The psychological impact of violence on staff working with adults with intellectual disabilities

By: Howard, Ruth.
Contributor(s): Rose, John | Levenson, Victor.
Series: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities 22 (6) 2009: 538-548.Publisher: 2009Subject(s): ADULTS | STAFF ATTITUDES | VIOLENCE | INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY | EFFECTS | STAFF STRESS | BURNOUT | CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR | SELF EFFICACY | SURVEYSSummary: Explores the relationship between levels of violence, with fear of violence, self-efficacy, staff support and burnout. Finds that services which are organized to manage violence may be better placed to support staff experiencing violence. Fear of violence may decrease with exposure to violence, perhaps due to increased self-efficacy. Training and support for staff may increase self-efficacy, thus reducing burnout. Believes that longitudinal research is needed to increase understanding of the relationship between violence and burnout.
List(s) this item appears in: Support Staff Violence Assault
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Explores the relationship between levels of violence, with fear of violence, self-efficacy, staff support and burnout. Finds that services which are organized to manage violence may be better placed to support staff experiencing violence. Fear of violence may decrease with exposure to violence, perhaps due to increased self-efficacy. Training and support for staff may increase self-efficacy, thus reducing burnout. Believes that longitudinal research is needed to increase understanding of the relationship between violence and burnout.

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