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Why do I have to? A book for children who find themselves frustrated by everyday rules.

By: Leventhal-Belfer, Laurie.
Contributor(s): Montaini-Klovdahl, Luisa.
Publisher: London Jessica Kingsley Publishers 2008Description: 77 p. : ill. 25 cm.ISBN: 9781843108917.Subject(s): CHILDREN | BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT | JUVENILE LITERATURE
Contents:
Preface for children|Preface for adults|Rules that may be frustrating at home|Rules that may be frustrating about friends|Rules that may be frustrating about school
Summary: "Looks at a set of everyday situations that provide challenges for children at home, with their friends and at school... empathizes with children's wish to do things their way, explains clearly why their way does not work, and provides a list of practical suggestions for how to cope with these challenges and avoid feelings of frustration. This is the ideal book for children who have difficulty coping with the expectations of daily living, as well as for their parents and the professionals who work with them." - BOOK JACKETReview: Written with children in mind, this straightforward book is full of useful advice regarding everyday situations that can prove difficult and annoying for any child, but particularly for those with Asperger’s syndrome. Laurie has used examples from the “Friends Program” that she was involved in, to develop the strategies, advice and goals in this book. The examples are fitted into 3 groups; at home; at school; with friends and the same format is used throughout. A situation is defined, possible ways of coping explained, with reasons as to why behaviour patterns are expected. At the end of each section the child is invited to suggest their own ideas as to how to improve their enjoyment of a situation. The book ends up with a goal chart. Laurie has used a practical approach to solving problems with an obviously clear understanding of the way children think and feel, especially their need to be involved in all discussion and decision making. This book will be useful for families and carers working with children.
List(s) this item appears in: Fairness and emotions Jan 2019 | Self regulation Feb 2019 | Primary Resources for Children (Cat) June 19
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    average rating: 3.0 (1 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book IHC Library
410.3 LEV (Browse shelf) Checked out 27/08/2019 W000224
Total holds: 0

Preface for children|Preface for adults|Rules that may be frustrating at home|Rules that may be frustrating about friends|Rules that may be frustrating about school

"Looks at a set of everyday situations that provide challenges for children at home, with their friends and at school... empathizes with children's wish to do things their way, explains clearly why their way does not work, and provides a list of practical suggestions for how to cope with these challenges and avoid feelings of frustration. This is the ideal book for children who have difficulty coping with the expectations of daily living, as well as for their parents and the professionals who work with them." - BOOK JACKET

Written with children in mind, this straightforward book is full of useful advice regarding everyday situations that can prove difficult and annoying for any child, but particularly for those with Asperger’s syndrome.

Laurie has used examples from the “Friends Program” that she was involved in, to develop the strategies, advice and goals in this book. The examples are fitted into 3 groups; at home; at school; with friends and the same format is used throughout. A situation is defined, possible ways of coping explained, with reasons as to why behaviour patterns are expected. At the end of each section the child is invited to suggest their own ideas as to how to improve their enjoyment of a situation. The book ends up with a goal chart.

Laurie has used a practical approach to solving problems with an obviously clear understanding of the way children think and feel, especially their need to be involved in all discussion and decision making. This book will be useful for families and carers working with children.

Patron comment on 23/09/2014

Able to use some of the ideas in the book and adapt them when needed

Patron comment on

I went through this book with my son - (9yrs). He understood all of the examples and told me what he does in a couple of the questions - I liked the angle of "think outside the square" examples given - thank you.

Patron comment on

Didn't realise it's for big kids to read, but it is a good book and I will keep it in mind when my boy is about 9-10

Patron comment on

Great resource but more for older students/ students with good comprehension, receptive language

Patron comment on

We thought this was a good book (for us) but our ASD student wasn't remotely interested! Oh well.........

Patron comment on

Didn't find it useful this time with Down Syndrome student

Patron comment on

Found it very helpful with a young teenager who had struggled with the sort of issues highlighted in this book

Patron comment on

My "46 chromosome" daughter loved it. My "47 chromosome" daugher would find this too wordy - but for a future use I may call upon it. I found it great to remind me of the obvious!

Patron comment on

Extremely appropriate - only trouble was he couldn't be bothered reading it himself so I had to read it to him! Even he noted that all the points I read were like him which added impact to their importance

Patron comment on

We actually found the info on Book Depository and ordered a copy - also gave info to our cluster schools

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